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Advantages of NTFS partition February 18, 2008

Posted by Vijay in Education, Technology.
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The NTFS file system, introduced with first version of Windows NT, is a completely different file system from FAT. It provides increased security, file–by–file compression, quotas, and even encryption. It is the default file system for new installations of Windows XP, and if you’re doing an upgrade from a previous version of Windows, you’ll be asked if you want to convert your existing file systems to NTFS. Its a default requirement for Windows Vista. You can convert FAT16 or FAT32 volumes to NTFS at any point. Just remember that you can’t easily go back to FAT or FAT32 (without reformatting the drive or partition), and i bet you wont think of it. For this reason, many system administrators, myself included, used to recommend that users format at least a small partition at the beginning of their main hard disk as FAT. But with the enhanced recovery abilities built into Windows XP (more on that in a future column), I don’t think it’s necessary or desirable to create that initial FAT partition.

When to Use FAT or FAT32?

If you’re running more than one operating system on a single computer (Dual OS), you will definitely need to format some of your volumes as FAT. Any programs or data that need to be accessed by more than one operating system on that computer should be stored on a FAT16 or possibly FAT32 volume. But keep in mind that you have no security for data on a FAT16 or FAT32 volume and any one with access to the computer can read, change, or even delete any file that is stored on a FAT16 or FAT32 partition. So do not store personal files on partitions formatted with FAT file systems.

P.S:

Its recommended to use NTFS rather than FAT when you have an individual system.